WHY ARE THE TYPICAL 12 STEP REHABS FAILING….?? HERE’S A CLUE….

 

The treatment system fails because it’s rooted in an entrenched, inaccurate  view that addicts are morally bereft and weak. If they weren’t, the belief goes,  they’d stop using when drugs began to negatively impact their lives. Most  treatment centers in the U.S. are based on an archaic philosophy that’s rooted  in the 12-step model of recovery. These programs have saved countless lives, but  they don’t work for a majority of people who try them. It’s not a fault in the  program itself. Its founder, Bill Wilson, wrote, “These are but suggestions.”  But many rehabs require them. This is particularly problematic for teenagers and  young adults, the very people most susceptible to addiction. Twelve-step  programs require people to accept their powerlessness and turn their lives over  to God or another higher power. Many adolescents question religion, and in  general teenagers aren’t going to turn their lives over to anyone.

In many 12-step-based programs, patients are berated and yelled at if they  don’t “surrender” and practice the steps. They’re warned — in some cases,  threatened — that if they don’t, they’ll relapse and die. It can become a  self-fulfilling prophecy. Addicts don’t think they can be treated if they don’t  embrace the program, and so they give up on the idea that they can be helped.  They do relapse. Some die. When they do, they’re blamed. Blaming the victims is  convenient for those who treated them, because it absolves them of  accountability. They can take credit when their patients get well, but they take  no responsibility when they don’t. But the bigger problem with 12 steps is that  a growing body of evidence has proved that addiction isn’t a choice subject  to willpower but a brain disease  that’s chronic, progressive and often fatal

Read more: http://ideas.time.com/2013/04/03/we-need-to-rethink-rehab/#ixzz2hEzopK1B

4 replies
  1. James Michie says:

    A “Wellness Recovery” is shown to be the most effective thus far. The holistic mind-body-spirit approach, which may or may not include the 12-step spiritual program, will not only help addicts to be the best they can be, but everyone. It was Dr. Carl Jung who inspired Bob and Bill to write the 12-steps when he said that he had never seen anyone recover from serious addiction, except in some cases where the individual had undergone what he termed as a “spiritual awakening”. He did not say that this “spiritual awakening” had to be achieved through 12-Step as it did not even exist yet. But, Jung did give Bill and Bob some “experience, strength and hope” to share with the rest of us after saying that he knew of some cases that had succeeded in staying clean and sober by following a spiritual path. A spiritual path may be as simple as learning a meditation technique for someone suffering in early recovery. Ultimately, every individual will choose their own path, anyway. It is so nice to work with addicts and help them to find their way. I am happy to inform, introduce and try all of the alternatives available together with the client, including 12-Step Fellowships. Many addicts, not all, can benefit from the instant network of new friends and phone numbers to call with the 12-Step spiritual program. Members of 12-Step Fellowships are people who also have a desire to quit who are always available and it is free. I know from working with addicts that not all of them do well in group situations, especially some with dual diagnosis and we mustn’t abandon them because they don’t do well in 12-Step. I know that force never works with addicts/alcoholics, anyway. Never. We should help everyone, regardless. Thank you, James

  2. James Michie says:

    A “Wellness Recovery” is shown to be the most effective thus far. The holistic mind-body-spirit approach, which may or may not include the 12-step spiritual program, will not only help addicts to be the best they can be, but everyone. It was Dr. Carl Jung who inspired Bob and Bill to write the 12-steps when he said that he had never seen anyone recover from serious addiction, except in some cases where the individual had undergone what he termed as a “spiritual awakening”. He did not say that this “spiritual awakening” had to be achieved through 12-Step as it did not even exist yet. But, Jung did give Bill and Bob some “experience, strength and hope” to share with the rest of us after saying that he knew of some cases that had succeeded in staying clean and sober by following a spiritual path. A spiritual path may be as simple as learning a meditation technique for someone suffering in early recovery. Ultimately, every individual will choose their own path, anyway. It is so nice to work with addicts and help them to find their way. I am happy to inform, introduce and try all of the alternatives available together with the client, including 12-Step Fellowships. Many addicts, not all, can benefit from the instant network of new friends and phone numbers to call with the 12-Step spiritual program. Members of 12-Step Fellowships are people who also have a desire to quit who are always available and it is free. I know from working with addicts that not all of them do well in group situations, especially some with dual diagnosis and we mustn’t abandon them because they don’t do well in 12-Step. I know that force never works with addicts/alcoholics, anyway. Never. We should help everyone, regardless. Thank you, James

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply