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The Addictions Coach: Which Detox is Worse? Oxy, Heroin, or Methadone

The Addictions Coach: Which Detox is Worse?  Oxy, Heroin, or Methadone.

Client, ‘John Doe’, is interviewed by Cali Estes of The Addictions Coach.   He shares his experiences with detoxing off of these three drugs, and the one he picks as the worst to detox may surprise you.  We can help you recover from your addiction, or work with you to stay clean and sober if you are in recovery.  Visit us at www.theaddictionscoach.com  or call 1.800.706.0318

detox sign

This is a first hand, personal account of an opiate user’s detox from Oxy, then Heroin and then Methadone. The most trying detox of the three may surprise you.

In 2009 John moved to Miami having never touched an opiate in his life, but after living in the pain pill capitol of Florida for over a year his curiosity got the best of him. A coworker turned him on to 15mg Roxy which rapidly turned into a habit. For the first 90 days John didn’t seem to detox when he didn’t have the pills, just a little tired. That’s when the whole game changed. Getting bored with the 15mg Roxies, John raised the bar to 30mg Roxy and within weeks increased to two 30mgs at a time.

Around mid 2010, Miami and all of South Florida really cracked down on local pill mills which led to John’s detox from Roxy. The scientific side of this is Roxy has a shorter half-life than other opiates so it leaves the body quicker so you get sick faster and it is very intense, but it is also over much quicker. With the Roxy, just getting through the first 72 hours is the key. Being a touring musician John left Miami for 5 weeks and seemed to have dodged a major bullet. So you would think.

Within 2 weeks of returning from the road, John started looking for pills again with no luck. That’s when his old dealer turned him on to Heroin which was cheaper and much more available. In John’s mind he had struck gold, a $100 a day roxy habit was now a $40 a day heroin habit. But true to form, that $40 a day heroin habit quickly turned into a $80 a day habit and then right back to $100 a day.

This usage lasted 2 years until personal and financial issues put the brakes on his party. This is where our first detox comparison comes in. John had quit Roxy cold turkey and suffered for 48 hours so he went into this situation with the same mindset. Huge mistake! At about the 24 hour mark from his last heroin dose the detox grabbed him physically and began 7 days of living  Hell. The first 48 hours of this new heroin detox immobilized John. He couldn’t get out of bed while violently throwing up and couldn’t even keep liquid down which contributed to major dehydration. Days 3 and 4 weren’t any better. Still not being able to eat, John had no energy at all. It took every ounce of will just to walk to the kitchen and bathroom. Thinking he was going to die, John suffered through the insomnia and night sweats until Day 6. Keep in mind, this detox has been much longer than the Roxy detox. Day 6 detoxing from Heroin seemed to give John some hope. Still fatigued with zero energy, John’s other physical symptoms had gone. Now it was just dealing with being tired. By Day 9 he was fine. But how soon we forget the bad part of addiction.

After 90 days of no Heroin or opiates, John found himself craving a few bags of Heroin and temptation gave in and within days he was in full blown usage again. Over the past year he knew he had to stop. He tried a few times but all the memories of the prior detox reminded him that help was needed. He could not go through that 7 day period again. After researching his options John decided to give Methadone a try and at first it worked like magic. 24 hours after his last Heroin dose John took his first dose of Methadone. Expecting the worst, John entered Day 1 with tons of anxiety but no sickness occurred. He continued the Methadone daily and there was never any sickness. Just a little lethargy, but no sickness. After 2 weeks on Methadone John felt safe to taper down and stop.

This is where our final detox comparison comes in. Keep in mind that John only used Methadone for 2 weeks. Methadone has a much longer half-life and can last upwards of 36 hours before it even begins to leave the body. This can give a false sense of security when stopping. You will detox from Methadone and it could take 3 days before you began to feel sick. This is exactly what happened to John. Day 1 and 2 after stopping Methadone showed no signs of detox. But Day 3 was a different story. Complete fatigue set in and John began to fear the worst. Day 4 and 5 was another 48 hour window of complete fatigue. By Day 6 the stomach issues were back in full force along with the night sweats. Day 7 welcomed back the insomnia and for the next week John suffered through no energy, night sweats and insomnia for a total of a 2 week detox off Methadone. Twice the time of detox off Heroin and 3 times the detox off Roxy.

Methadone is a publicly supported maintenance program to detox from other opiates. This account is from an actual opiate user and the above story is his account of each detox. There are alternative methods surfacing to detox from opiates and you can find more information about these methods at www.theaddictionscoach.com

Another Overdose in Florida. Was the rehab at fault or the individual? What are your thoughts?

Another Overdose in Florida.  Was the rehab at fault or the individual? What are your Thoughts?
You want the best for your loved ones.  We do too.  The Addictions Coach is here for you.  www.theaddictionscoach.com  1.800.706.0318
nicole cronin fl overdose
See excerpts below:

Pee Scams, Kickbacks, And Overdoses Plague South Florida Rehabs

Cat Ferguson

Nicole Cronin was one of the hundreds of people who overdose in Palm Beach County every year. She came to South Florida for help, but instead found a rehab system with weak scientific backing that’s riddled with fraud.

When Nicole Cronin’s parents sent their daughter from suburban New Jersey off to a Florida rehab to treat her opiate addiction, they hoped it would help free her from the relapses they’d watched her cycle through at home.

 Full article below:

The Ten Greatest Reasons to Hire a Professional Coach

The Ten Greatest Reasons to Hire a Professional Coach

sign post -guidance

What is the benefit of hiring a Professional Coach in any field: Life Coach, Business Coach, Fitness Coach, Recovery Coach, Family Recovery Coach, or any other specialized coach?

I get asked this question quite often from both sides of the equation: as an instructor of Professional Master Coaches, and as a successful business woman who utilizes a Professional Coach.  I’ll share with you my top ten reasons why I believe anyone should hire a Professional Coach.

Hello I am Your Coach
Before I share my thoughts with you on the top ten reasons to hire a Professional Coach, I want to define what a Professional Coach is and what they do.

A Professional Coach is:

A highly trained and very skilled individual
A professional with tools to get the job done
A very motivated individual who motivates others
An ethical and responsible person
A caring people person
A very advanced cheerleader
An action-oriented problem solver
A flexible, goal-driven communication specialist
A perception and perspective changer
A blockage buster and solution finder
It’s also important to look at what Professional Coaches are not to truly understand who they really are.

A Professional Coach is not:

A banker or accountant
A therapist or counselor
A sponsor or twelve-step guide
A psychiatrist
A goal or objective setter
A date or romantic interest
A party pal
A person with a conflict of interest in relation to a client
An uneducated or untrained individual
Interested in selfish, unethical, or illegal matters
Now that I have identified what a Professional Coach is and is not, I would like to describe what a coach does.  Coaching is a results and client driven process where the coach assists the client to reach a solution.  It is a development or training process where a client receives support while working towards goals and objectives via specific action plans, where the coach utilizes core competencies, skill sets, and tools to help the client see past blockages and reach solution or meet goals.  There are many different types of coaching:

Coaching Types and Styles:

1. Business Coaching
2. Recovery Coaching
3. Christian Coaching
4. Executive Coaching
5. Life Coaching
6. Financial Coaching
7. Health and Wellness Coaching
8. Fitness coaching
9. Relationship Coaching
10. Personal coaching
11. Family recovery coaching

There are many different types and styles of coaching; the largest difference today is peer coaching and Professional Coaching.  The difference is just like it sounds, peer coaching is peer to peer often volunteer, and Professional Coaching is a highly trained and skilled individual and almost always paid for their services. Professional Coaches use a range of communication skills such as active listening, powerful questioning, paraphrasing, the natural laws of cause and effect, reading body language, tones, and inflections, observation, intuition, action planning, and other activities. Professional Coaching helps an individual to identify their capabilities and skill sets that already exist internally and put them into motion to reach solutions in all coaching fields.

Now I’ve identified what a Professional Coach is and isn’t and what they do. You have to be prepared before you execute; now you’re ready to get the information you’ve been waiting for. What are the ten greatest benefits of hiring these highly trained and skilled individuals?

  • Every problem has a solution because the problem defines the solution; there is perspective and perception problems that block most clients from getting to solutions on their own, Profession Coaches help clients get past these blocks and reach solutions.
  • We all are human, thus we all suffer from the human condition. We all have blind spots; Professional Coaches can help clients can point out areas of weakness that clients miss or don’t see.
  • We all need someone to hold us accountable. Clients can take on greater responsibility by meeting with their coach on action plans with specific time tables and follow-up.
  • A Professional Coach will help redirect the client when they are off track with their action plan. The coach is trained to be flexible; however, to keep the plan moving forward toward solution.
  • A Professional Coach is trained to bring out the very best in the client through communication skills and other coaching techniques. The client won’t just be spinning in circles, but actually, always moving forward toward solution.
  • The coach brings extra talent to the table. When the client sets the goal, then the coach and client brainstorm together to reach solution; there is twice the creativity.
  • We all need spiritual sounding boards in our lives. Even coaches need coaches! I haven’t met a highly successful person yet who doesn’t have a coach!
  • Professional Coaches celebrate all the victories with the client, no matter how big or small. A win is a win!
  • Clients can communicate with their coach in confidence and confidentiality. The coach will always be supportive and non-judgmental. The coach may suggest change; however, it will be in a positive and nurturing way.
  • Professional Coaches get results! They bring out the best in clients and expect the champion from within to show him or herself.

 

 

This really is a no brainer!  If you could achieve your goal, increase your bottom line, lose those pounds, win that championship, or at least increase your chances for success, wouldn’t you do what it takes?  Professional Coaches make all the difference!

“I’ve seen the power of Life Coaching firsthand and I know how beneficial it can be.”  Leeza Gibbons

The Addictions Academy of Miami, Florida Trains and certifies Professional coaches in several Types and Styles.  The Academy’s instructors are some of the best in the industry, current, knowledgeable, and cutting edge.

The Addictions Academy offers National Certifications and Training in Life Coaching, Recovery Coaching, Family Recovery Coaching, Gambling Addiction Coaching, Food-Addiction Coaching, Sex-Addiction Coaching, Relationship-Addiction Coaching, Fitness Coaching, International Master Addictions Coaching, and much more.
If you would like to hire a Professional Coach you can reach the Addictions Coach at 1-800-706-0318 or visit their website at https://theaddictionscoach.com.  If you are interested in training to become a coach you can contact The Addictions Academy at 800-706-0318 or visit their website at http://ww.theaddictionsacademy.com.

© 2015 Cali Estes, Ph.D

Cali Blue top 2015

The Addictions Academy: Ten Secrets to Becoming an Expert Interventionist!

The Addictions Academy:  Ten Secrets to Becoming an Expert Interventionist!

www.theaddictionsacademy.com

1.800.706.0318

happy people

An interventionist is a highly skilled, well-trained professional. To be of maximum benefit to the chemical dependency and mental health fields an interventionist must become an expert in the art of successful interventions for those still sick and suffering and their families. The Addictions Academy of Miami, Florida offers an array of courses to prepare potential interventionists to become experts in their field. The following are the Academy’s ten top secrets to becoming an expert interventionist.

  1. To be the best, you need to be trained by the best!

Let’s be honest, if you don’t care who trains you as an interventionist, it’s a crap shoot as to your success in training and skills. You should do your research and find highly skilled professionals with years of experience in the field of interventions. The best instructors are not people who read books; they are professionals who have the experience in the field that can show you the different techniques to be successful. The Addictions Academy’s instructors have many years experience in the field and have had hundreds of successful interventions using different methods and techniques.

  1. An interventionist has to be prepared before they execute.

Successful interventionists plan out their interventions. An intervention should never be rushed or spontaneous; it should be carefully planned out usually at least a week from the original call. The interventionist’s transportation, and lodging, needs to be set up, as well as the date, time, and location of the intervention.   A contract needs to be sent to the client, a deposit sent from the client, and a pre-intervention plan set up. The interventionist also needs to have a good idea of appropriate treatment facilities for the client and an escort plan to transport the client to the facility chosen. Successful interventions are well planned and thought out in advance.

  1. Don’t trust what you hear; trust what you see!

Often family members will be the initial contact with the interventionist. The family may think that they’re providing concrete facts, but more often than not, their facts are not one-hundred percent accurate. They may be enablers who have been manipulated by their addicted loved one. Perhaps the family has been lied to about the facts. The referral resource just simply may not know the facts. Even when the interventionist communicates directly with the addicted family member, they still may not get to the truth. Interventionists must trust their instincts and use all of their professional skills to make decisions on the client. Remember that body language is 55%, tones and inflections 38%, and the spoken word only 7% of trusted human communication.

  1. Interventionists don’t react on emotions.

An intervention is loaded with emotions, tears, yelling by family members, and anger. The interventionist stays professional and never reacts based on emotion. Interventionists rely on their training, experience, common sense, and wisdom. Interventions can become very heated between loved ones, prepare the family that you may ask certain people to step outside if their actions interrupt the positive flow of the interventionist’s progress. Interventionists remain professional at all times; they never get pulled into the family’s drama.

  1. Professional interventionists have to be able to understand family dynamics.

T he interventionist must be able to identify and understand the dynamics of each family unit. This information is invaluable as a tool for the interventionist’s success in handling the client and the outcome of the intervention. Most important is finding out who the enabler or enablers are in the family unit. The enabler can sabotage the whole intervention if not identified and handled. The hero in the family is another key player in the family unit. The hero will assist in the intervention with blocking the enabler. To have a successful intervention, the other players worth identifying are, the family mascot, the scapegoat, the lost child, and of course the addict or addicts. The intervention will use all this information to their advantage and even set the room up for success with a door blocker, spacers, leader, and enforcer within the family units. The Addictions Academy breaks down family dynamics in-depth during their training courses for professional intervention students.

  1. Professional interventionists must know how to identify and handle different types of clients.

All clients are not the same! Some of the basic characteristics that interventionists screen for are genetic factors, emotional stress, psychiatric problems, and unresolved issues from the client’s past. Types of clients can include the following

ANGRY DEFIANT CLIENT

RUNNER/PHYSICAL

COMBATIVE/ CLIENT

DEPRESSED CLIENT

MENTAL HEALTH CLIENT

ASPBERGERS/AUSTISTIC CLIENT

CHRONIC PAIN

PHONE/TEXTING TYPE CLIENT

CODEPENDENT CLIENT

NARCISSITIC CLIENT

EXECUTIVE CLIENT

WEALTHY CLIENT

CRIMINAL CLIENT

PHYSICAL ISSUES CLIENT

Expert interventionists must be able to master dealing with and identifying all the different types of clients and adjust their intervention process accordingly. The Addictions Academy will instruct their students on the proper procedures for handling these types of clients and role play and rehearse handling these types of clients.

  1. Plan on a smooth intervention and be ready for a rocky one.

Interventionists must be ready for the curve ball, the fastball, and the slider!  Anything can and will happen during an intervention. The interventionist must be on their toes at all times. No physical violence should be tolerated! The police may have to be called if things get out of control. They must make sure that everyone is safe. The interventionist may have to deal with denial, anger, verbal abuse, accusations, and must be prepared to follow through with consequences. The interventionist never really knows how things will go in advance. The main point is that they are ready to handle the worst possible situation and hope for smooth sailing.

  1. The interventionist must remain positive at all times.

No matter what happens, the interventionist should always remain positive and hopeful toward solution for the clients. The family has been through very hard and emotional times, they may quickly become negative. The interventionist can help set the tone and mood for the intervention by remaining positive. This should lead to a good outcome.

   9.    There are several different models of interventions.

There is a simple intervention: One person confronts addicted person Plan on a smooth intervention and be ready for a rocky one.

A Classical Intervention: educating the family, pre-intervention.

A Family System Intervention: Multiple family members addicted.

A Crisis Intervention: Stabilize the situation quickly, rehabilitation follows.

Johnson Model (Surprise Model): Often used by Interventionists.

The Arise Model: Involves the addicted person from the beginning.

The Invitational Intervention Model: Involves the whole family.

Systemic Intervention Model: Focus is on the family, highly successful with process addictions

The RAAD Intervention Model: Reading the client, assessing the situation, anticipating client needs, and directing the flow.

Depending on the situation and the client, some models are more appropriate than others for specific situations. The Addictions Academy uses the RAAD model of intervention in most cases. You will learn about all the above listed intervention models during their training.

  1. Interventions aren’t only for substance abuse and alcoholism.

Alcoholic: (Chronic, Drinks every Day.)

Alcoholic: (Binge Drinker, Does not consume every day.)

Drug addict: non shooter (pills)

Drug addict: shooter (IV Injections)

Drug addict smoker (crack, meth, pills etc)

Functioning Drug addict or alcoholic

Non addict but excessive user

Process Addictions: Sex Addict, Pathological Gambler, Eating Disorders (Behavior Addictions)

Cutting/Self Harm

Mental Health

There are many different forms of addiction that interventionists may have to confront. The Addictions Academy covers all these forms of addiction during their intervention training.

The main goal of any intervention is to get the client to seek professional help for their addiction problems, traumatic event, crisis, or other serious problem. The above listed information should be a part of any interventionist training. The Addictions Academy trains new interventionists to be the best that they can be; to become seasoned experts is the ultimate goal. For more information visit the Academy’s website at www.theaddictionsacademy.com or call 800-706-0318. Our children are dying every minute of every hour of every day from addiction. More professionals are needed to handle this terrible disease. Are you the next expert interventionist? We hope you are! “Stick with the Winners!”

 

Los Angeles Sober Coach: Young Athletes Being Turned into Heroin Addicts

Los Angeles Sober Coach: Young Athletes Being Turned into Heroin Addicts
www.theaddictionscoach.com  1.800.706.0318
 heroin needle
Roman Montano had barely learned cursive when he was asked to sign his first baseball. Parents of teammates had watched him dominate game after game in Albuquerque’s Little League during the summer of 2000, mowing down batters and belting home runs. The autograph requests were mostly facetious, but what they signified was clear: The kid was going somewhere. The next few years only confirmed that notion.
Roman grew to 6’6″ and 250 pounds. He made a mockery of the weight room at Eldorado High and ran the 40-yard dash in 4.9. As a sophomore defensive  lineman he was honorable mention all-state in Class 5A. He also joined the basketball team his senior year, giving in to the pleadings of the coach, and was instantly the Eagles’ best player. And after high school, when he trained with the legion of MMA fighters based in Albuquerque, they encouraged him to compete as a heavyweight.  Baseball though, was always his favorite sport—”the most funnest,” as he had put it to the Albuquerque Tribune when he was 12. He once struck out all 18 batters in a Thunderbird League game. The towering righty was Eldorado High’s ace, his fastball reaching the 90s. The second starter? Ken Giles, now a flame-throwing Phillies reliever. “You’re talking about a guy with a ton of potential: size, natural ability, attitude,” Giles says. “Everyone wanted to be him, but everyone wanted to be around him, too. The first word I would  use to describe Roman is lovable.”
A foot injury his junior year didn’t derail Roman. He needed minor surgery on a small bone, but he popped some OxyContin and after a few weeks was back on the mound. His senior year Roman planned to lead Eldorado to a state title and then declare for the 2008 major league draft (the Braves had expressed the most interest in him), spurning about 20 Division I scholarship offers. Before the season, though, Roman committed one of those judgment-deprived acts for which teenagers are known. He and some friends used a stolen credit card at a mall. They got caught. The school found out. Though it was Roman’s first offense, he was kicked off the team. Humiliated, angry and depressed, Roman thought back to the numbing effect of the OxyContin. His prescription had run out, but that wasn’t much of an impediment. In the upscale Northeast Heights—more High School Musical Albuquerque than Breaking Bad Albuquerque—painkillers were competing with marijuana and alcohol as the party drug of choice. “There are pill parties,” says Roman’s younger brother, Beau. “[Pills are] so easy to get. They’re everywhere.”
Roman was soon in the grip of Oxy. He lost interest in baseball. He showed up high for graduation. JoAnn Montano and her husband, Bo, who owns a wheel-alignment and body-shop business, figured their son was just floundering—until JoAnn caught him using. She took him to an addiction center, and he was prescribed Suboxone to treat his opioid dependency.Roman, though, couldn’t fully kick his habit. Before graduation he had switched to a cheaper substance that offered the same high at a lower price: heroin.  At first Roman smoked “black” (black-tar heroin), a relatively crude version of the drug that was easy to obtain. Then he began using intravenously. But he hid his addiction well. He stayed on Suboxone, took up competitive bodybuilding and started training at an MMA gym. He had a job selling phones for Verizon. “He looked so healthy, a big, strapping guy, not like a junkie,” says Bo. “He was back doing his athletics. We thought the addiction was behind us. We didn’t know how cunning and how manipulative this drug is.”
On May 2, 2012, Roman was supposed to lift weights with his father in the morning. Roman didn’t show up, and texts to him went unanswered. His fiancée, Mikaila Lovato, couldn’t find him either.  In the evening two chaplains went to the Montanos’ house, asking for Roman’s next of kin. They said that Roman had been found slumped in the driver’s seat of his car behind a FedEx store, a syringe in his arm, the motor running. He was 22 and dead from a heroin overdose. This is just one personal story of many that are now flooding our sports teams. Heroin overdoses have tripled in the past 5 years in the sports industry and it all seems to start with the same story.  An injury leading to pain pills, the pills leading to heroin and heroin leading to overdoses and death. We are here to help at Top Rated Addiction Recovery and Sober Coaching Services Don’t let your addiction take your life.

The Addictions Academy: LIVE in MIAMI Sept. 10-12th. Advanced Clinical Intervention Professional training.

The Addictions Academy: LIVE in MIAMI Sept. 10-12th. Advanced Clinical Intervention Professional training.

SEATING Is LIMITED!! Don’t Miss this Class.  Register Today!  Save Lives! www.theaddictionsacademy.com 1.800.706.0318

ADVANCED CLINICAL INTERVENTION PROFESSIONAL  TRAINING

(includes 6 hours ethics via on demand) PLUS 24 HOURS HANDS ON INSTRUCTION.

In this Advanced Clinical Intervention Training Course we will teach you how to provide Intervention services for every type of client, not just one specific model or style. You will learn BOTH THE SURPRISE AND INVITATIONAL MODELS. In this course you will gain an overview of all systems, the pre qualifying of the client (unique to The Addictions Academy), pre intervention, intervention, post intervention. We specifically define body language, when and how to end the intervention, how to read your client (spoken and silent cues), how to use family to your advantage, when to do an Individual verses a Family intervention and more. Our classes are always didactic so you will get hands on role play experience. We cover the aggressive client, the crying client, the mental health client, the criminal client and of course Ethics and Legal issues.

When choosing an advanced intervention training course, you want the best most comprehensive National Intervention Training possible.  Our courses include an introduction to the basics of mental health disorders such as Codependency, mood disorders, and other DSM-V disorders, some problems that you will see when working with families and family members when performing a professional intervention. Our goal is to help you to begin to understand the basic clinical aspects of mental health and commonly seen disorders when working with family members, addicts, alcoholics and people who suffer from all types of compulsive behaviors. We use the exclusive RAAD Model.

We cover Individual, Family and Business Interventions on an in depth level and we teach you tips and tricks to complete the interventions in 4 to 12 hours max from the time you step out of the car or off the plane. The Exclusive RAAD model focuses on body language, client placement, meeting the client at their level and proper placement for continuum care.

What is included in each of our intervention training programs:

*Overview of all models, and strengths and weakness of each
*RAAD Model   (unique to The Addictions Academy– no one shoe fits all concept)
*Body Language Concepts
*Interactive hands on class in person  or by webinar, select dates.
* 5 MOCK INTERVENTIONS in real time
*Learn Specific techniques to Intervene with  Mental Health Clients
*Learn Specific techniques to Intervene with  Criminal Clients
*Learn Specific techniques to Intervene with  Wealthy Clients and high profile persons
*Learn Specific techniques to Intervene with  Special Populations (Aspberger’s, autism, learning disabilities)
*Family and Individual Intervention Platforms
*Business Interventions (unique to The Addictions Academy! )
*Interventions for Anger Management Clients
*Interventions for Food Addiction and Eating Disorders
*Interventions for Sex Addicts
*Interventions for Gambling Addicts
*Masters Level Teachers with over 1000 actual logged Intervention hours.
*Evaluation of the proper clinical intervention approach
*Analysis of correct Case Management Skills prior to the Intervention and post Intervention
*Bottom line, Impact and Love letters are all addressed
*Clinical problem solving in unexpected situations during the Intervention
 The Professional Value of Courses:
  • Increase your client base!
  • Increase your earning potential
  • Add Credentials to your Name
  • Learn from a National Education Provider
  • Make yourself more marketable to treatment centers and others
  • Increase your income WITHOUT TAKING INSURANCE
  • How to market yourself as an Advanced Clinical Interventionist
  • How to expand your clientele base and start your own Intervention Business
  • Contracts and forms for clients, Service Contract, HIPAA Compliance, Duty to Warn, and Confidentially Forms
  • Decrease AMA and APA rate
  • Travel at your leisure with your clients, all expenses paid.

 

Call today at 1.800.706.0318 to register  

NAADAC Education Approved Number 130309

– See more at: http://www.theaddictionsacademy.com/therapy-professionals/recovery-courses-and-certificate-programs/advanced-clinical-intervention-training/#sthash.LB2CqhNU.dpuf

The Addictions Academy: Interventionists are SAVING LIVES! Academy student reflects on first intervention.

The Addictions Academy:  Interventionists Are SAVING LIVES!  Academy student reflects on first intervention.
www.theaddictionsacademy.com  1.800.706.0318
beautiful day to save lives -greys anatomy“I want to thank you again for your help with my first official intervention. Literally almost everything thing you said would happen, HAPPENED. The biggest take aways for me were, ALWAYS make sure the guns are out of the house, trust your gut instinct on what family members should be at the intervention, don’t get disappointed if the person says no at first, and don’t underestimate the power of the bottom line :)”
 
Eric Peyton Dallas, Texas 
Interested in Helping Others and Saving Lives?   Our National Intervention Professional Training program may be perfect for you.
If you have ‘the gift’ to help people get into rehab or detox and turn their lives around, this career as a Professional Interventionist is for you.  You may be in recovery yourself and have a true desire to help people by using your intervention training skills.  With our Professional Certificate in Intervention, you will learn how to assist your clients in the most ethical and legal way possible with the least resistance on their end.
We teach clear and concise methods that are evidenced based practice and all of our intervention training courses cover ethics, legal issues specific to intervention, pre screening for the proper intervention, pre-intervention, intervention and post intervention. We offer real world case scenarios and teach you body language and proper client placement during a clinical intervention.
– See more at: http://www.theaddictionsacademy.com/therapy-professionals/recovery-courses-and-certificate-programs/intervention-training/#sthash.64jOp0EI.dpuf

The Addictions Coach: Kratom for Opiate Withdrawal. What is it and How Does it Work? Guest Blog from Author, Wendi Rook

The Addictions Coach: Kratom for Opiate Withdrawal. What is it and How Does it Work? Guest Blog from author, Wendi Rook.

https://www.kratomdivine.com

www.theaddictionscoach.com  1.800.706.0318

 

Kratom book   kratom

 

 Kratom For Opiate Withdrawal

Kratom is becoming increasingly more popular as an effective tool for easing the symptoms of opiate withdrawal.  Withdrawal can be debilitating and extremely uncomfortable, lasting for days and sometimes even weeks.  In this post, we’ll explore how opiate withdrawal works and how you can use kratom to effectively ease the symptoms of opiate withdrawal.

What is Opiate Withdrawal?

Opiates all share one thing in common: they all act upon the brain’s μ-opioid receptors.

To help you easily understand this concept, imagine there are little pits in the cells of your brain (the  μ-opioid receptors ).

When these pits are filled, you experience the effects of opiates, such as pain relief, relaxation, and euphoria.  When you live with these little ‘pits’ filled for a long period of time, your brain’s chemistry changes to accommodate this new norm.  Your brain then comes to rely upon the opiates to fill those ‘pits’.  If the pits are not filled, the body reacts in a very negative way – that is the experience of withdrawal.

How Does Opiate Withdrawal Effect The Brain/Body?

Opiates impact many different body systems, so the experience of withdrawal is very much a total body experience, which is part of what makes opiate withdrawal so unbearable and profoundly debilitating for some individuals.  Opiates impact three primary areas of your brain.

First, the limbic system- also known as “the control center” for emotions. When the individual has opiates on board they will feel relaxed and content, in control of their emotions. When they are not present however, the individual will feel stress and anxiety, and often have difficulty sleeping.

Second, the brainstem- which controls your body’s breathing, temperature and heart rate. When the individual has opiates on board the heart rate and respirations tend to slow. Once withdrawn however, they tend to experience a racing heart, sweating and the chills.

Third, the spinal cord- the highway which transports signals between the body and the brain. Under the influence of opiates, the individual experiences reduced pain signals, but once opiates are withdrawn, the experience of pain becomes present and the individual may feel lots of aches and pains, similar to the flu. Headache, runny nose and excessive tearing are also common symptoms.

Digestive upset is yet another typical opiate withdrawal symptom. Individuals may vomit or experience diarrhea; often, people experience both. This can lead to dehydration, which results in more feelings of discomfort, as it may worsen nausea and exacerbate headache. If dehydration, vomiting and diarrhea continue, the individual may suffer from a severe electrolyte imbalance, which can ultimately lead to seizures. This firestorm of symptoms also makes it virtually impossible to sleep, which only worsens the individual’s anxiety and misery.

How Long Does Opiate Withdrawal Last?

The duration of the withdrawal varies among individuals. The worst typically occurs for a span of three to five days. Some may feel close to normal in about one week, whereas others may feel unwell for two or three weeks. It all depends upon how long it takes the individual’s body to normalize and recover. With such a broad range of what are often very severe symptoms, it’s no wonder individuals seek out help for easing the withdrawal process. That’s precisely where kratom saves the day!

Kratom can produce lots of opiate-like effects, but it’s not an opiate. This is key, as it provides relief, without perpetuating the cycle of dependence upon the opiate. The active ingredients in kratom are called alkaloids. One alkaloid, called mitragynine, is a stimulant, while the other primary alkaloid, 7-hydroxymitragyine, is regarded as a sedative and analgesic. Like opiates, these alkaloids impact the brain’s μ-opioid receptors — the same receptors or ‘pits’ that are affected by opiates.

How Do You Use Kratom for Opiate Withdrawal?

So will kratom help with opiate withdrawal? Yes. Absolutely. You can use kratom for mild opiate withdrawal or more severe withdrawal. Ideally, you should have kratom on-hand before the withdrawal progresses to the severe stage. Keeping ahead of the game, so to speak, is best as it will allow for optimal stability. So rather than waiting for withdrawal symptoms to progress to a severe state, it’s wise to take kratom before the symptoms become unbearable. Remember that vomiting and nausea are very common symptoms of opiate withdrawal and all methods entail drinking or eating the kratom. If you’re suffering from acute vomiting, it may be very difficult to keep down your dosage of kratom.  So it’s very important to take kratom before you start feeling the full impact of withdrawal.

When using kratom for withdrawal, it’s important to select a variety that is best suited to your unique symptoms.  Some kratom varieties provide greater relief for anxiety and stress, while others are more effective in providing sedative effects and promoting sleep and relaxation.  Other varieties work well for providing a boost of energy.  Consider which symptoms are most troublesome or bothersome to you and select a kratom variety that is best suited to bringing about the effects that will counteract your bothersome symptoms.

Kratom’s most powerful effects last about 4 to 5 hours, so when you begin to feel a ‘break-through’ and when your symptoms begin to return, it’s time to take an additional dosage.  The kratom dose for opiate withdrawal will vary according to your unique physiology, the type of opiate you were taking, and the dosage that you were taking.  It really varies among individuals, so most would recommend taking a moderate dosage of 2-4 grams of kratom powder.  Then, wait a period of about 30 minutes to feel the effects.  After 30 minutes passes, take an additional 1 gram.  Wait an additional 30 minutes and re-evaluate.  If necessary, take 1 additional gram.  This process can be repeated until you achieve the optimal dosage.  Once you determine the right frequency and the ideal kratom dosage for opiate withdrawal symptoms, you can take this dosage throughout the most intense period of withdrawal.  Once you begin to feel more like ‘normal’ and the withdrawal symptoms begin to wane, you can begin the process of weaning of kratom.

Is kratom addictive?  Kratom is not addictive, but it is always best to gently transition away from kratom rather than stopping suddenly. This allows for a less abrupt change at a physical level and at a psychological level.  Remember that many withdrawal symptoms are psychological and many have an intense fear of withdrawal.  So even though there is no physical cause for withdrawal, an individual can still experience symptoms if the mind believes that withdrawal is going to occur.  Therefore, it’s best to gently wean off of kratom, gradually reducing the dosage each day and/or extending the amount of time between doses.  You can wean at a rate that is comfortable for you.

Many use kratom to get off opiates.  It is regarded as a very safe solution, as kratom does not create the serious risk of overdose that you see with opiate drugs.  What’s more, kratom has vey few, if any, side effects.  So if you are considering using kratom for opiate withdrawal, take some time to research to find out if it’s the right solution for you!

Wendi Rook, ARRT R.T. (R)(T)

website:  https://www.kratomdivine.com

blog: www.blog.kratomdivine.com.

book: http://amzn.to/1KfMGkq

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seattle Sober Coach: Coca Cola researchers say you DON’T need to Kick The Can habit, just exercise HARDER!

Seattle Sober Coach:  Coca Cola researchers say you DON’T need to Kick The Can habit, just exercise HARDER!

7 Amazing things that happen to your body when you give up soda.

soda splash

Coca Cola researchers say you DON’T need to Kick The Can habit, just exercise HARDER!

Yes, their exercise “scientists” claim that there is no scientific fact that the empty calories, ton of sugar, or worse, the artificial sweeteners, and the chemical ingredients  in their drinks are contributing to the obesity of Americans.  We are just overweight because we don’t exercise enough!

Now we all know that exercise IS an important factor in becoming healthy and maintaining a healthy lifestyle, however, you can not undo all that hard work when you step into the kitchen, and still expect to get healthy.  Our diet, including the food and drink choices we make is the number one way to get on board with a healthy lifestyle!  Even if the ONLY thing you change, is to KICK THE CAN Habit, your body will benefit significantly.  Read on for 7 Amazing things that happen to your body when you give up soda.

Visit www.theaddictionscoach.com  if you need help with a food addiction, or www.theaddictionsacademy.com  if you are compelled to help others with this serious addiction.  1.800.706.0318

https://www.yahoo.com/health/7-amazing-things-that-happen-to-your-body-when-you-126344262978.html

 

The Addictions Academy: MORE TOOLS FOR SUCCESSFUL RECOVERY from Faculty member, Boris Schaak of Sober Fitness.

The Addictions Academy:  MORE TOOLS FOR SUCCESSFUL RECOVERY from Faculty member, Boris Schaak of Sober Fitness.

Boris is the founder of Sober Fitness and a member of the teaching team at The Addictions Academy.  www.theaddictionsacademy.com  1.800.706.0318

 

MORE TOOLS FOR SUCCESSFUL RECOVERY

soberfitness   boris

When I stopped competing and slacked off with my workout routine (which at the time was my therapy, my solitude), I quickly slipped into an oblivion of drugs and alcohol, which at first was fun (stupid fun), then it was fun with problems, and then it was just problems which ended with me being alcoholic, drug addicted, and homeless. I remember my very first meeting like it was yesterday. When the other members and speakers stated to go to a meeting every day, go to the same meeting every day, get a commitment, become accountable and help others – I said to myself “Oh wow! I know this process. This is just like a fitness regimen”. My life is like Groundhog Day (and if you’ve seen the movie, you know its great fun). I go to my meetings at the same time. I eat the same things at the same times. I meet with my sponsor at the same time. I workout at the same time, train clients at the same time, and I sleep at the same time. My Fridays are not all that different from my Tuesdays. It’s called a regiment. It doesn’t matter if it’s in fitness or in recovery, the same principles apply. When you keep the process going one day at a time, positive change will happen.

When in recovery, having a lot of free time is not a good thing. Filling an addict’s day with things to do is something that automatically benefits them by keeping their mind occupied with positive things. Just like knowing when and where my next meeting is, going to the gym requires commitment and planning. Let me explain this further. I need to take the time to plan when and how I’m going to get to the gym, at the gym I need to figure out what muscle group(s) I’m training and what equipment I’m going to use and the proper way to workout. If I want results from my workout program, I now need to implement a fit and healthy meal plan that requires me to educate myself on nutrition and implementing that into my daily life, which further requires me to educate myself about what foods I’m shopping for so that I can prepare my meals for the week. Then lastly, knowing how much sleep my body needs to recover and ensuring that I get enough sleep every night. All of a sudden, I have this regiment that keeps me accountable for progress; physically, mentally, and spiritually.

As a recovering addict, I need to have a frame work in place. The same principles that apply to get sober are the exact same principles that are needed to get fit. That frame work is my meetings, my fellowship, daily input from my sponsor, and my 12 Step work; adding a fitness routine based upon the same principles that I already practice through my 12 Step work, will now give my body a much better chance to recover psychically and therefore my mind can now actually focus and grasp all the new positive information needed to rebuild my life. All these things, by the end of the day, give me a better chance to be happy, joyous and free, sometimes more, sometimes less. Not only that but it holds me accountable for my actions daily. I am truly on top of my game, my spiritual maintenance that I don’t have a need to use and I can honestly say that I am happy, joyous, and free.

Written by:

Boris Schaak

Founder of Sober Fitness

www.soberfitness.com

 

If you have questions in regards to fitness in recovery, you can reach me at boris@soberfitness.com. Thank you!