THE CHALLENGES OF TREATING CHRONIC PAIN IN OPIOID ADDICTS

As headlines about opioids focus on misuse of the drugs, physicians who treat patients with chronic pain are grappling with how to deal with opioid dependence. At the recent American Psychiatric Association meeting, pain specialists said that treating patients in pain who are dependent on opioids involves a delicate balance between managing pain relief and risk of drug abuse.

“One of the challenges is that we don’t have good estimates of how common it is for chronic pain patients to develop problematic opioid use” says Jennifer Potter, PhD, MPH, in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio. “The vast majority of people with chronic pain do not go on to develop an opioid addiction, so it’s important for patients to understand that if this medication benefits you, it’s not necessarily a concern. We can’t let our response to the rise in prescription drug abuse to be denying access to all people in pain who can benefit from opioids. We need to build our understanding so we can manage our risk of drug abuse effectively.”

Rates for co-existing chronic pain and opioid addiction vary depending on where you look, Dr. Potter says. “For patients in a pain clinic, addiction rates are relatively low, but in a methadone or buprenorphine population, between 34 to 40 percent will have a chronic pain complaint,” she says.

A doctor treating a person for pain needs to look for potential risk factors for substance abuse, such as a personal or family history of other types of substance abuse or psychiatric disorders, Dr. Potter says. “If a person has one of these risk factors, they shouldn’t automatically be denied opioids, but they should be informed of the risk of dependence and be monitored for potential abuse.”

For some people with chronic pain, medication isn’t always the answer, says Dr. Potter, who is studying the treatment of opioid dependence and chronic pain through a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. “There’s a false assumption that giving medicine makes pain go away, but in chronic situations that doesn’t always work,” she says. “Many people only get some reduction in pain.”

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.