Dr. Cali Estes is on Elevate The Conversation, Discussing Marijuana Use for Opioid Addiction.

elevate

Elevate The Conversation with Doctor Frank – Dr. Cali Estes, Counselor, Life Coach, Recovery Coach

Dr. Cali Estes – Counselor, Life Coach, Recovery Coach works with patients suffering from addiction. She and Frank and Ron will be talking about addiction therapy and how the War on Drugs, and the subsequent enforcement of drug laws, are more of a hindrance than a help. And about prescribing medical marijuana to combat detoxing from addictions and how she got into the business.

https://youtu.be/H3iG7hT2_9Y

Dr. Cali Estes discusses Failure to Launch Syndrome, her Recovery Coach workbook and addiction treatment on Afterbuzz TV’s Book Circle Online

 

Afterbuzz Tv’s Book Circle Online, Dr. Cali Estes discussed Failure to Launch Syndrome, her Recovery Coach workbook and addiction treatment.
failure to launch

Interview with Dr. Estes | Book Circle Online

 Dr. Cali Estes can help your son or daughter go from dependence to self-reliance and success!
We all know the classic example of the 30-something living in mom & dad’s basement and working at the local pizza parlor, or the 28-year old college drop-out who’s thrown in the towel on the prospect of education and success. We call it Failure-to-Launch Syndrome, and it is a surprisingly common condition especially among the Millennial Population. They seem lost, not quite sure of whom they are or what they want to do in life. They lack direction, ambition and purpose. As a parent you are probably stressed and feel helpless in how to help them. Dr. Cali Estes specializes in this behavior.
 
 

Can marijuana be the answer to the opioid epidemic? Dr. Cali Estes on Suicide Girls Radio TONIGHT 8pm PST

Can marijuana be the answer to the opioid epidemic?

marijuana
Can marijuana be the answer to the opioid epidemic? Wednesday, June 27 on SuicideGirls Radio, host Bradley Suicide and Nicole Powers will be joined by celebrity addiction specialist and life coach Dr. Cali Estes.
Tune into @sgradio.info tonight 6/28 LIVE @ 8pmPT as Addiction Specialist @DrCaliEstes discusses marijuana and its effects on opioid withdrawal #SuicideGirls

You can listen – and watch – SuicideGirls Radio live on Wednesday nights from 8 til 9 PM at our state-of-the-art, all digital home on zinna.tv.

 

Dr. Cali Estes Discusses Failure to Launch Syndrome on Afterbuzz TV’s Book Circle. TONIGHT at 4pm PST

 

Dr. Cali Estes Discusses Failure to Launch Syndrome on Afterbuzz TV’s Book Circle. TONIGHT at 4pm PST
launch
Does your millennial have Failure-to-Launch Syndrome? Don’t miss @AfterbuzzTV’s @BookCircleOnline as Renowned Life Coach and Addiction Counselor @DrCaliEstes addresses the latest epidemic, lends her advice to help dependent millennials and discusses her latest workbook for coaches, tomorrow 6/28 LIVE @ 4pm PT!
Afterbuzz TV’s Book Circle 
Dr.Cali Estes can help your son or daughter go from dependence to self-reliance and success!

Dr. Cali Estes: Can Marijuana Treat Drug Addiction? Tune in TONIGHT at 6pm PST on Elevate The Conversation

 

Dr. Cali Estes:  Can Marijuana Treat Drug Addiction? Tune in TONIGHT at 6pm PST on Elevate The Conversation

 

marijuana

Can marijuana treat drug addiction?

We’ve been trying to get Dr. Cali Estes onto my podcast Elevate the Conversation for a while now, but destiny seemed to always get in the way. Well, we could call it “destiny”, but “being incredibly busy” seems the more accurate term. Cali is certainly incredibly busy, and when you talk to her you get a sense of boundless energy emanating from her voice.

Cali works with patients suffering from addiction. We caught up before her appearance on the show, this Wednesday at 6pm (pst) on Facebook LIVE, to talk about addiction therapy and how the War on Drugs, and the subsequent enforcement of drug laws, are more of a hindrance than a help. We’ll be chatting about prescribing medical marijuana to combat detoxing from opiate addictions and how she got into the business.

https://medium.com/@DrFrank./can-marijuana-treat-drug-addiction-20161db218e0

Eating Healthy in Recovery: Does it help? Guest Post by Luke Pool

 

healthy

Eating Healthy in Recovery: Does it help?

When it comes to recovery, many people assume that it’s all about going to rehab and addiction treatment. Of course, rehab is often an important component of recovery, but it’s far from the only piece to the puzzle. In fact, much of the rehabilitation process entail learning strategies and habits that will help a person to sustain his or her newfound sobriety for the long-term. To an extent, one might think of rehab as a bootcamp for learning the healthy habits of sobriety, particularly when it comes to taking caring of oneself and ensuring that basic needs are met. One of those essential needs is nutrition.

But is diet really that important to the recovery process? To what degree does nutrition affect a person’s rehabilitation from addiction? Should diet be a focus as a person transitions from rehabilitation to sustained recovery? Let’s take a moment to consider why someone in recovery should take care to maintain a healthy diet and what the benefit good nutrition may have to the longevity of sobriety.

Physical health in addiction

As a person develops an addiction, he or she becomes less and less concerned about his or her basic needs. The alcohol and drugs take an increasingly central role in the individual’s life, usurping much of his or her attention and leaving very little focus for things like mental health, physical health, and basic nutrition. Some substances can have a direct and rapid impact on health, which is the case with alcohol since it often causes an increase in weight gain and cocaine, a substance that inhibits appetite and affects nutrition in a different way. Over time, a person’s body begins to change, becoming less healthy and often experiencing a deficit in many key nutrients. Moreover, these nutritional deficits can trigger a chain reaction, decreasing cognitive functioning and other bodily systems.

The cumulative effect is that, as the individual becomes more addicted to alcohol or drugs, the secondhand effects of the addiction — poor physical health, poor nutrition, increasingly poor cognitive performance — continue to exacerbate these negative effects. In short, it’s a downward spiral.

Nutrition and recovery

There are a number of common misconceptions about addiction recovery, one of which is that going to rehab is effectively a cure for addiction. However, that’s not quite the case. In recovery, a person learns what led to the addiction, how to avoid those factors, and how to restore himself or herself to a state of overall health; the latter is particularly important, but we’ll get to that in a moment.

In many inpatient and residential addiction treatment programs, nutrition is a significant part of the rehabilitation process. The reality is that most individuals neglect their physical health over the course of addiction, and when they’re in active addiction for an extended period of time, they almost forget how to care for themselves. It’s for this reason that physical health, diet, and nutrition are of increasing importance to the recovery process. In effect, a rehabilitation programs uses nutrition to help individuals in recovery regain their health; meanwhile, during the rehabilitation process, individuals are re-learning how to address these needs, which will be particularly important as they proceed to more advanced stages of recovery.

Although there are many reasons why nutrition is important to recovery, it’s particularly important because it precipitates strong cognitive performance. The nutrients that a person needs to maintain a state of overall health are obtained from foot; therefore, when an individual eats a poor diet, he or she suffers from poorer cognitive functioning, which makes it much less likely that he or she is able to maintain his or her sobriety. In fact, being in a state of poor nutrition inhibits the body’s ability to absorb nutrients from food; in other words, as a person’s nutrition worsens, his or her ability to obtain nutrients from food decreases. As such, nutrition is an important part of rehabilitation because it helps a person’s body become better able to absorb essential nutrients. Further, when there’s adequate nutrition, the individual’s cognitive performance improves, facilitating a more effective recovery and stronger chances of being able to maintain lasting sobriety.

There are also some pretty basic benefits to having good nutrition as an individual proceeds from active addiction through rehabilitation and into lasting recovery. For one thing, a well-rounded diet helps to repair the damage that the body sustained from habitual substance abuse. Further, it enhances an individual’s immune system, protecting him or her from illnesses and allowing the individual to recover from general illnesses quicker. A healthy diet also improves mood and energy levels, which can contribute to a successful and long-lasting recovery since many individuals relapse due to things like fatigue, general feelings of unwellness, and poor mood.

 

 

Luke Pool is a grateful member of the Recovery community. He has found his purpose in life by helping those who suffer from the diseases of addiction. He uses blogging and social media to raise awareness about this epidemic, affecting every part of this country. Now working for Stodzy internet marketing, he is able to pursue his passion by informing as many people as possible about addiction. Originally from Austin, Texas he now lives in South Florida.

 

 The Addiction Academy Offers a  BRAND NEW COURSE!

Nationally Certified Nutritional Recovery Coach Train with us in a Live Virtual Classroom!

August 12-13.

Register Today!  Limited Seating! 1.800.706.0318 ext. 2

Today Is All I Have and It’s Also All That Matters. Written by Jay Keefe

 

Today

People ask me how long I’ve been sober quite often.

I always answer honestly and I never round up.  I feel like I’d be jinxing myself if I did.

As of this writing I have a little over seven and a half years.

Why don’t I know the exact length of my sobriety?

I’m sure I could figure it out if I did the math but I just don’t feel like it right now.  It’s a moot point anyway, because today is all I have.

I know my sobriety date is October 4, 2009.  I know that much.  I woke up on a futon, crammed into the boiler room of my brother’s basement.  I was crying.  I couldn’t believe I was waking up hung over.  Again.

So I surrendered to alcohol and did the work I needed to do.

But anything beyond my sobriety date and today doesn’t matter.

I know people who have been sober for less than a year who are extremely focused and on point.  Their recovery is amazing.  They’re doing the work they need to do to change themselves and they’re giving back.  They’re centered and calm and open-minded and accepting of others.  They admit their faults, apologize when necessary and are active and contributing members of society-quite a big change from the people they were when they were active in their addiction.

I also know people who have been sober for a long time, who are lost.  Sure, they put the drink or the drug down, but they never took an honest look at themselves and grew into the person they have the potential to be.

One of the first people I met in recovery had been sober for almost fifteen years.  After spending a few hours with him, I realized he was a paranoid, racist, sex addict who judged almost everyone who crossed our path in the short time we spent together.

Needless to say, I stopped talking to him.

I met another guy about six months after taking my last drink that had seventeen years of sobriety.  He was a decent guy, although a little self-centered (aren’t all of us alcoholics?) but was almost always late when we met out in a social setting.

I was helping him lose weight and one day I waited over 45 minutes for him.  When he didn’t show up, I worked out alone.  He showed up just as I was finishing (almost two hours after we were supposed to meet) and got mad when I said I was done and was leaving.  He threw a tantrum, insulted my integrity and stormed out of the gym.

I chalked it off to him having a bad day and forgot about it.

A few days later we were at a drive-thru.  His nine-year-old son asked for a donut and the guy said, “Shut your fucking mouth before I smack your head off your neck.”

I stopped hanging out with him that day.

But (and here’s the important part), I had to “clean my side of the street”, so to speak.  I had to tell each of these guys that I couldn’t hang out with them anymore.

I didn’t have to tell them the specific reasons, nor did I have to be derogatory or accusatory when I said it.  I simply told them I had to focus on myself, wished them the best, and left it at that.

I’ve since seen both of them on separate occasions.  One has changed quite a bit and one is still the same paranoid, racist, sex addict I met almost eight years ago.

But that’s on him.

I want him to change.  I want him to grow.  I want him to do the work that other people suggested of me so he can have the freedom myself and countless others have.

It’s not easy work, and it can certainly be exhausting, but I know it changed my life.

But no matter what I want for other people I can’t do anything about it.  I can’t make anyone drink and I can’t keep anyone sober.  All I can do is focus on myself and continue to grow.

Nothing changes if nothing changes, they say, and although it took me a while to understand the meaning of it, today I do.

And guess what?

Today is all I have and it’s also all that matters.

 

Jay Keefe,  Director of Happiness and Staff Writer at The Addictions Academy

National Academy of Sports Medicine Certified Personal Trainer

Published Author of “And Drink I Did”

Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/1MBF5fo

 

 

Dr. Cali Estes is Featured on The 4 Principles of Success discussing Law of Attraction and Addiction.

 

Dr. Cali Estes discusses the power of Law of Attraction and Addiction on The 4 Principles of Success podcast and how to deal with addiction and how to succeed in all things in Life.

Dr. Cali Estes specializes in helping you get ‘unstuck’ and move forward with the goals and dreams you have in Life. Do you know what keys you need to achieve success? Do you know how to unlock the bliss and success you crave? Dr. Cali Estes will assist you in opening up new doors and pathways to success. She will assist you in creating the positive mindset to focus on unleashing your potential, unlocking your passion and discovering your purpose in Life. Unlocking your stuck points in both personal and business matters will create the ability to let happiness and life success flow.

Dr. Cali Estes gets to the root cause of the ‘stuck points’ and problem sectors of your life, to assist you in moving forward in a productive, happy and excited manner.

Learn more about Dr. Cali Estes and Success in Life Coaching

 

WE’VE SEEN THE ENEMY…. AND IS HE THE ADDICT? Guest Post from Attorney Jeffrey Lynne.

addict

Attorney Jeffrey Lynne shares a new frustration while working in the addictions industry, and it’s not what you might expect.

WE’VE SEEN THE ENEMY…. AND IS HE THE ADDICT?

Published on SoberLaw News 

written by Jeffery C. Lynne Esq.

I made a huge mistake the other day. I had a lapse in judgement and commented on a local Facebook post about another treatment center being “raided.” I took exception to the term “raid” because the word evokes images of Seal Team Six taking out Osama Bin Laden, as opposed to what really happened, which was the serving of a search warrant by local law enforcement. Forgive the lawyer in me. I tend to like accurate facts rather than images conjured upon by the written word.

When I made this statement, those who have been unofficially identified as the “Addicts’ Parents and Friends Facebook Mafia” began to personally attack me for working with and legally representing an otherwise lawful healthcare industry that they believe to be inherently rife with corruption. These are the same people who would lynch a lawyer for representing anyone they pre-determined to be guilty. Salem Witch Hunt, Version 3.0.

While I did not take it personally, it did open a festering wound about how I feel about those suffering with Substance Use Disorder and those who provide services to them.

So, before I continue, what I am about to say is not going to be popular and I am sure I am going to receive many more threatening emails and negative Facebook posts as a result. But that’s ok. I tend to have my own problem with biting my tongue when it comes to telling the inconvenient truth.

Continue to full article below:

http://soberlawnews.com/weve-seen-enemy-addict/

WE’VE SEEN THE ENEMY…. AND IS HE THE ADDICT? Guest Post from Attorney Jeffrey Lynne.

Attorney Jeffrey Lynne shares a new frustration while working in the addictions industry, and it’s not what you might expect.

WE’VE SEEN THE ENEMY…. AND IS HE THE ADDICT?

Published on SoberLaw News 

written by Jeffery C. Lynne Esq.

I made a huge mistake the other day. I had a lapse in judgement and commented on a local Facebook post about another treatment center being “raided.” I took exception to the term “raid” because the word evokes images of Seal Team Six taking out Osama Bin Laden, as opposed to what really happened, which was the serving of a search warrant by local law enforcement. Forgive the lawyer in me. I tend to like accurate facts rather than images conjured upon by the written word.

When I made this statement, those who have been unofficially identified as the “Addicts’ Parents and Friends Facebook Mafia” began to personally attack me for working with and legally representing an otherwise lawful healthcare industry that they believe to be inherently rife with corruption. These are the same people who would lynch a lawyer for representing anyone they pre-determined to be guilty. Salem Witch Hunt, Version 3.0.

While I did not take it personally, it did open a festering wound about how I feel about those suffering with Substance Use Disorder and those who provide services to them.

So, before I continue, what I am about to say is not going to be popular and I am sure I am going to receive many more threatening emails and negative Facebook posts as a result. But that’s ok. I tend to have my own problem with biting my tongue when it comes to telling the inconvenient truth.

Continue to full article below:

http://soberlawnews.com/weve-seen-enemy-addict/